Kick Off A Safe And Healthy Summer

Kick Off A Safe And Healthy Summer

Memorial Day is the traditional start of summer, meaning outdoor time, swimming, picnics and travel. Here are tips to keep your family healthy, happy and far from the ER.

Not Looking Forward To Swimsuit Season?

If you want to lose weight, says Lisa Lillien of the Hungry Girl website, don’t use crash diets, just make healthy choices. Spend weekend time prepping proteins and veggies. Then for a hot dinner, just throw the ingredients together. Have smart snacks around: jerky, protein bars, nuts, fruit. Eating more often seems counter intuitive, but prevents overeating at mealtime.

More about food: At picnics, keep mayonnaise salads cool. Enjoy them straight from the refrigerator; don’t let them sit more than 15 minutes in the sun.

Water Inside

Proper hydration is important, especially in hotter weather. Drinking enough water improves body function and keeps you from feeling unnecessarily hungry. Eight 8-ounce glasses of water daily will maintain moisture balance, but if you’re a caffeine drinker, triple that. Bonus: Staying hydrated gives skin that healthy glow.

Water Outside

Remember being told, “You’ll drown if you go into the water right after eating”? That’s too strong, but Sue Leahy, president of the American Safety and Health Institute, says during digestion, “There’s less blood flow in your body and this takes away from strength. So if you really had to use your strength for undertow, you might have a problem.” Best to wait half an hour after you eat.

Children pose different problems. The National Safety Council says more than one in five drowning victims are 14 or under. Find age-appropriate swim lessons for your child, and don’t rely on lifeguards; never leave your child unattended.

Be Good to Your Skin

Just one blistering sunburn doubles your risk of melanoma. You have to apply the right kind of sunscreen (SPF 15 or higher), frequently (every two hours), and enough: a teaspoon for the face, and about a shot glassful for the body.

If you forgot, apply cooling botanicals generously at the first sight of a pink glow to reduce peeling and inflammation.

Be Good To Your Eyes

To help prevent cataracts, as well as wrinkles, wear sunglasses that block at least 99% of ultraviolet A and B.

Watch For Heat Stroke

This is a big problem for outdoor workers and older people in apartments without air conditioning, but can happen to anyone.

“The first sign is cramping in the legs,” says Sue Leahy. “Cool off and drink fluids until it goes away. Cramping – especially in the leg – is a sign the body is losing salt and electrolytes, and you should heed it.”

Get Debugged

Bugs can transmit Lyme disease, West Nile, Zika, and other illnesses. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend insect repellents containing DEET (10% to 30%), except on children under 2 months.

Move It But Don’t Lose It

If your children travel by bicycle, skateboard or scooter, they need helmets that meet CPSC safety standards. Never let children ride near moving traffic.

Don’t allow children too young to have a driver’s license on riding lawnmowers or off-road vehicles. Children are involved in 30% of ATV-related deaths and ER injuries.

Fireworks

The Fourth of July is a big summer event,and emergency rooms brace for the injuries. Fireworks can cause severe burns, blindness, scars or worse – even sparklers can reach over 1000 degrees and can start fires. The National Safety Council says that in 2010, fireworks caused about 15,500 reported fires, including 1,100 structure fires. Families should attend professional community fireworks displays rather than using fireworks at home.

SOURCES:

http://people.com/food/hungry-girl-summer-weight-loss-tips/

http://www.dermalogica.com/top-6-summer-skin-tips/ys_skinaging_2,default,pg.html

https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Summer-Safety-Tips.aspx

http://www.nsc.org/learn/pages/safety-events-summer-safety.aspx

Staying Healthy During Flu Season

Staying Healthy During Flu Season

his time of year, everyone’s got a sniffle, cough, or worse … the dreaded flu bug! These viruses have evolved to be highly resistant to our efforts to contain them.

While we can’t prevent the disease completely, we can help lower the risk of spreading it around. Here are 5 ways to beat the flu this year!

1) Wash your hands

This is the best way to keep the flu from spreading. Your hands are the most likely vectors for spreading disease. You touch something with the virus on it, then touch your eyes, nose, or food. Soon, you’re coughing too much.

Regular hand-washing is the first line of defense. Wash your hands after using the bathroom, before meals, and after contact with someone who might be ill. If your job entails lots of public contact, take regular hand-washing breaks. Scrub for 20 seconds with soap and warm water.

If you can’t get to soap and water, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Accompany the sanitizer with a moisturizer as too much sanitizer can lead to dry, cracked skin and a greater risk of disease.

2) Practice good self-care

Your immune system needs energy to keep your body free of disease. That means getting adequate sleep and proper nutrition.

A good night’s sleep is especially important for preventing the spread of infectious diseases. Eating a diet rich in vitamin C can also strengthen your immune system. Citrus is a great source, as are leafy greens.

3) DAB- destroy all bacteria

“Dabbing,” involves tucking your nose into your elbow. It’s the most sanitary way to cover your mouth when you sneeze or cough.

Covering your mouth with your hands doesn’t do much since you’re going to touch other things with your hands. Your elbow, though, doesn’t see nearly as much contact.

4) Practice self-quarantine

If you’re sick, stay home. If your children are sick, keep them home. No one likes missing work or school, but the alternative is even more widespread illness. Staying home will also give you time and rest to recover faster, leading to more productivity when you go back in.

Always wait 24 hours after a fever has broken before returning to work. There’s nothing heroic about “toughing it out” while getting others sick .

If you can’t stay home, at least take steps to prevent disease from spreading. Avoid prolonged contact with anyone. Wash your hands, and avoid touching things other people regularly touch. Warn others that you’re feeling sick so they can keep a safe distance.

5) Avoid crowds

Wherever lots of people gather, disease follows. If possible, avoid crowded public spaces this time of year.

Remember that travelers from far may have different strains of the same bugs. Whenever people from multiple communities gather, the chances of infection increase. If you’re entertaining or traveling, double down on good hygiene habits!

Your Turn: What’s your best health hack? Let us know how you stay safe and healthy!

SOURCES:

http://www.uwhealth.org/flu/10-ways-to-stay-healthy-during-cold-and-flu-season/10371

http://symptoms.webmd.com/cold-flu-map/avoid-cold-flu

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/habits.htm